Winter 2018/19 at Shakespeare’s GlobeThis winter we invite you…

Winter 2018/19 at Shakespeare’s Globe

This winter we invite you to play by candlelight in the gilded beauty of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse as we look to the past in order to question the present.

In our first festival of the season – ‘Ambitious Fiends’ – we pair Macbeth, Shakespeare’s meditation on the corrosive nature of power, with Christopher Marlowe’s pact made between the devil and Doctor Faustus.  

In the new year, we find ourselves ‘On the Shoulders of Ghosts’ as we turn our gaze to notions of identity, sexuality, desire and power in Richard II and Edward II.

We invite today’s writers to respond to Shakespeare and Marlowe with a range of new writing. Dark Night of the Soul is a collection of writing by women responding to the Faustian bargain, whilst After Edward regards the king with a queer eye.

Ralegh: The Treason Trial is an immersive verbatim account of the trial of an Elizabethan hero, performed 415 years after it shocked the nation. Before a short run in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, you can catch it in Winchester Great Hall, the location of the original trial.

Looking forward, Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank, our production for young people, will share the story of the tragic romance of Romeo and Juliet.

Our Read Not Dead series continues to shed light on rarely performed plays including Edward I by George Peele, and we have Macbeth and Henry V storytelling and workshops for families. 

Special events include Armistice Day, marking 100 years since the end of the First World War, and our Winter Wassail, a festive celebration of the season.  

Join us this winter as we explore stories from the past, the ghosts of then, and the storytellers from yesteryear, and simultaneously, collectively, create the ghosts of ‘tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow’. 

What’s past is prologue
The Tempest, Act II, scene 1

Become a Member to access priority booking

  • Advance priority booking for Patrons: Wednesday 20 June, 10.00am
  • Priority booking for all Friends and Best Friends: Monday 25 June, 10.00am
  • Public booking: Monday 16 July,10.00am

The Theatre at the Hippodrome Casino is being …

The Theatre at the Hippodrome Casino is being transformed into an intimate, state of the art, magical new home for the show which is based on the smash hit films Magic Mike and Magic Mike XXL.

Guests will enter Magic Mike’s mythical club and marvel as a group of extraordinary artists perform a 360-degree dance and acrobatic spectacular in front of, behind, and above their audience.  Sexy dance routines intertwined with one-of-a-kind acts will be presented by a wildly diverse cast of performers from around the world for this hot new production.  Made for a woman’s gaze but directed at a woman’s heart, Magic Mike Live will transport you to a world where the only thing hotter than the men are their unforgettable performances.

Empowering and exhilarating, Magic Mike Live is a scorching, immersive, dance and acrobatic spectacular that will leave you breathless. Whether you’re looking for the perfect date night or an unforgettable girls night out, with this show, the woman is always on top.

Get your tickets at http://magicmikelondon.co.uk

Shakespeare Trilogy on the BBC | Donmar Wareho…

Shakespeare Trilogy on the BBC | Donmar Warehouse:

sunrayravine:

Julius Caesar, Sunday 17 June on BBC FOUR
The entire Trilogy – Julius Caesar, Henry IV and The Tempest – available on iPlayer following the broadcast.

Realising the Design.James Perkins is the costume designer for…

Realising the Design.

James Perkins is the costume designer for this year’s production for The Winter’s Tale. In the run up to opening night he’s given us an insight into what work goes into dressing the cast, and the dangers of being enthusiastic about fabric.


Yesterday I got stuck in a costume.

It was like that moment you try on a ring, slide it past a knuckle and then realise, eyes wide, that you might need some soap.

Except it wasn’t a ring, and I couldn’t solve it with soap, it was a tailor-made irreplaceable pink overshirt, at work, with my new colleagues watching.

We have one in-house and one freelance costume supervisor. They transform my pencil drawings into beautiful reality. We’ve bought fabric from all over London, £3 per metre from Shepherds Bush Market vs appointment-only haberdasheries that sell one-off pieces of vintage embroidery. It’s not until you find and (importantly) touch the fabrics that you know what the costumes will really look like… I think that’s why I wanted to wear the shirt.

Our bespoke items have been sewn by a team of freelance makers. They all start from my drawings, yet their expertise means we have costumes that are both rich in detail as well as wearably practical.

Costume fittings, and the conversations that surround them, are a vital part of the process. The character, and therefore costume, belong to the actor. We can help and suggest and lead but the notes that cut to the core of the character’s identity will nearly always come from the actor.

We’re only halfway through fittings, but between the intelligence and wit of the cast and the support and wisdom of the costume team I’m quietly confident that the end result will be excellent.

I got the shirt off, eventually, with some help.

Tomorrow we’ll see if it fits an actor better…

 The Winter’s Tale opens Friday 22 June.

Images by James Perkins 

Realising the Design.James Perkins is the costume designer for…

Realising the Design.

James Perkins is the costume designer for this year’s production for The Winter’s Tale. In the run up to opening night he’s given us an insight into what work goes into dressing the cast, and the dangers of being enthusiastic about fabric.


Yesterday I got stuck in a costume.

It was like that moment you try on a ring, slide it past a knuckle and then realise, eyes wide, that you might need some soap.

Except it wasn’t a ring, and I couldn’t solve it with soap, it was a tailor-made irreplaceable pink overshirt, at work, with my new colleagues watching.

We have one in-house and one freelance costume supervisor. They transform my pencil drawings into beautiful reality. We’ve bought fabric from all over London, £3 per metre from Shepherds Bush Market vs appointment-only haberdasheries that sell one-off pieces of vintage embroidery. It’s not until you find and (importantly) touch the fabrics that you know what the costumes will really look like… I think that’s why I wanted to wear the shirt.

Our bespoke items have been sewn by a team of freelance makers. They all start from my drawings, yet their expertise means we have costumes that are both rich in detail as well as wearably practical.

Costume fittings, and the conversations that surround them, are a vital part of the process. The character, and therefore costume, belong to the actor. We can help and suggest and lead but the notes that cut to the core of the character’s identity will nearly always come from the actor.

We’re only halfway through fittings, but between the intelligence and wit of the cast and the support and wisdom of the costume team I’m quietly confident that the end result will be excellent.

I got the shirt off, eventually, with some help.

Tomorrow we’ll see if it fits an actor better…

 The Winter’s Tale opens Friday 22 June.

Images by James Perkins 

The Winter’s Tale in rehearsal. Blanche McIntyre directs…

The Winter’s Tale in rehearsal.

Blanche McIntyre directs Shakespeare’s great play of the irrational and inexplicable.

In a fit of groundless jealousy, Leontes wrecks his marriage, defies the gods, destroys his family and ruins himself. As the years roll around, a new generation flee their own country and take refuge in Sicilia. Unknowingly they bring with them the key to the past, present and future…

The Winter’s Tale opens Friday 22 June.

Photography by Marc Brenner

The Winter’s Tale in rehearsal. Blanche McIntyre directs…

The Winter’s Tale in rehearsal.

Blanche McIntyre directs Shakespeare’s great play of the irrational and inexplicable.

In a fit of groundless jealousy, Leontes wrecks his marriage, defies the gods, destroys his family and ruins himself. As the years roll around, a new generation flee their own country and take refuge in Sicilia. Unknowingly they bring with them the key to the past, present and future…

The Winter’s Tale opens Friday 22 June.

Photography by Marc Brenner

Globe on Tour: The Taming of the Shrew in production.Our Globe…

Globe on Tour: The Taming of the Shrew in production.

Our Globe on Tour cast are giving you the chance to choose the play you see performed. At Chilham Castle in Kent the audience chose to see The Taming of the Shrew from a selection that also included The Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night

Find your nearest tour venue.

Photo credit: Marc Brenner 

Globe on Tour: The Taming of the Shrew in production.Our Globe…

Globe on Tour: The Taming of the Shrew in production.

Our Globe on Tour cast are giving you the chance to choose the play you see performed. At Chilham Castle in Kent the audience chose to see The Taming of the Shrew from a selection that also included The Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night

Find your nearest tour venue.

Photo credit: Marc Brenner 

Research in Action: Laughter and madness in Commedia dell’Arte…


King Lear


Hamlet


As You Like It


Macbeth

Research in Action: Laughter and madness in Commedia dell’Arte and English stage comedy

Do you know me my lord?
Excellent well. You are a fishmonger.

Hamlet (Act 2, Scene 2) 

How do you react when you watch scenes from early modern dramatic works containing comic portrayals of frenzied, distracted or apparently ‘mad’ figures?

We are undertaking a research project aimed at investigating the relationship between laughter and power. We want to know more about the way laughter in the early modern theatre reflected and produced dynamics of power in early modern culture. What are the dramatic consequences of those dynamics? And how do the dynamics differ today?

On Monday 11 June at 6pm join us for a Research in Action workshop that explores present-day audience responses to scenes from early modern dramatic works containing comic portrayals of frenzied, distracted or apparently ‘mad’ figures.

We’ll be looking at extracts from the Commedia dell’Arte scenario ‘The madness of Isabella’ by Flaminio Scala, and The Honest Whore Part 1, by Thomas Dekker and Thomas Middleton. We’re interested in investigating how different styles of performance influence an audience’s emotional attitude to these ‘mad’ characters. When, for instance, do audiences laugh? When do they feel uncomfortable – perhaps about their own laughter?

We’ll unpick different interpretations of the symptoms of madness that these two works present: from tragic expression of despair, to comic physical awkwardness, and verbal nonsense.

Cast includes: Jamie Askill, Beth Park, Ruth Siller, Tok Stephen and James Wallace.

Exploring audience response to representation of madness on the early modern stage with Dr Bridget Escolme, Dr Maria Turri and Dr Will Tosh on 11 June.