Category: Emma Rice

Romantics Anonymous in RehearsalThis Friday sees the opening of…


The Romantics Anonymous company in rehearsal. Photo by Steve Tanner.


Marc Antolin (Ludo), Lauren Samuels (Ensemble), and Joe Evans (Ensemble). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Marc Antolin (Ludo). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Joanna Riding (Mother/Magda). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Marc Antolin (Ludo), Gareth Snook (Mercier), and Joe Evans (Ensemble). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Carly Bawden (Angelique). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Nigel Lilley (Music Supervisor), Jim Henson (MD) and Joanna Riding (Mother/Magda). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Marc Antolin (Ludo), Carly Bawden (Angelique) and Gareth Snook (Mercier). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Marc Antolin (Ludo), Joe Evans (Ensemble), Dominic Marsh (Jean-Rene) and Carly Bawden (Angelique). Photo by Steve Tanner.


Carly Bawden (Angelique), Dominic Marsh (Jean-Rene), Gareth Snook (Mercier), Natasha Jayetileke (Suzanne/Mimi), and Joe Evans (Ensemble) . Photo by Steve Tanner.

Romantics Anonymous in Rehearsal

This Friday sees the opening of our new musical in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Romantics Anonymous!

Here’s a sneak peek of the cast in rehearsals – you can find more photos over on Facebook.

Find out more about the show >>

Photography by Steve Tanner

We have absolutely loved having Kneehigh’s Tristan and…

We have absolutely loved having Kneehigh’s Tristan and Yseult, directed by Emma Rice here this month. Last three performances tonight, tomorrow afternoon and tomorrow evening.

Emma Rice explains why ‘Take Care of Business’ by…

Emma Rice explains why ‘Take Care of Business’ by Nina Simone resonates with her as part of our ‘Waxing Lyrical’ event . 

She will be joined by David Jubb on Thursday 29 June, while Nicholas Hytner & Ellen McDougall will be speaking on Friday 30 June about their life, their work, their influences and music which resonates with them. Find out more and book tickets: po.st/WaxingLyrical201

Waxing Lyrical: Desert Island Discs

Ahead of our upcoming Waxing Lyrical event in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, we asked three Artistic Directors, Ellen McDougall, Emma Rice and David Jubb, for some of the songs that have most inspired them…


Ellen McDougall
Otis Reading: Try A Little Tenderness
 

 Otis Redding’s Try A Little Tenderness brings back memories of The Brothers Size, the very first show I assisted on. It’s also a song that’s full of joy, kindness and tenderness, things can get disregarded but are so important. “To me, it’s just joy.”


Emma Rice
Buena Vista Social Club: Chan Chan
 

 This song is just the epitome
of the early years of Kneehigh. I fell in love with a community. I found myself
on a Cornish cliff with funny, sexy, wild mavericks. And we drank a lot and
laughed a lot and lived like gypsies.


David Jubb
The Wedding Present: Brassneck
 

 This song represents
my early twenties in College; it’s a bit messed up, tortured late-teenage
stuff. I had to live my teenage years in my twenties. Growing up I didn’t watch
TV, I wasn’t allowed people round, and didn’t listen to this sort of music. So
I had to live all my teenage years at College and this song reminds me of that
time.

Join our Associate Director, Matthew Dunster on 29 & 30 June, as he interviews leading Artistic Directors, Emma Rice, David Jubb, Nicholas Hytner and Ellen McDougall, about their life, their work and their influences. Their memories will be accompanied by handpicked pieces of music that have inspired them. Buy tickets.

Waxing Lyrical is part of our Festival of Independence. Find out more.

Emma Rice on directing Tristan & YseultInterview taken from…

Emma Rice on directing Tristan & Yseult

Interview taken from the Kneehigh Cookbook,
originally written in 2013.

Could you tell me a little about how it’s been coming back to directing Tristan & Yseult?
Returning to Tristan & Yseult is, in turn, a joy and an agony. I love this piece and marvel at the fusion of comedy, tragedy, chaos and sensuality. It is a pleasure and a delight to return to old friends and also to enjoy some new ones. However, this is a personal piece and it is laced with my own experience and my own heartbreak. Returning 10 years on doesn’t numb the pain, no! Ten years only compounds it, with more experience, more love, more laughter and more understanding to weave throughout.

How have rehearsals been going?
Brilliantly, except for the weather. This has been a freakishly cold May and we struggled to stay warm in our beautiful, but draughty barns. Still, we know how to keep warm with lots of food, lots of games, lots of fighting and lots of messing around.

Are you discovering new things in the show? How has it changed from last time?
Certainly. We are all ten years older and that experience informs the piece. There is a freedom in returning and a freshness. We have also been working with some new actors who bring a new outlook and a new chemistry. But, is it still the Tristan & Yseult we know and love? Yes.

Could you tell me a little bit about the history of the show?
We first made Tristan & Yseult as a site specific piece. It was to perform in two outdoor venues only; Rufford in Nottinghamshire and Restormel Castle in Cornwall – a wonderful, circular, ruined castle, perched on a hilltop and open to the elements. It became immediately apparent that this show touched audiences in a very special way, that this ancient story resonated deeply and strongly in the modern phsyce. It was spotted by the National Theatre who invested in the production to take it indoors, to make it more physical and more musical. This artistic investment really took the show, and the company, on to a new level, enabling us to develop the musicality of our work and create and tour on a larger scale. It went on to tour nationally and internationally and wherever in the world we go, this story touches the hearts of all.

How has your relationship with the piece changed, 6 years since its last tour?

No. It is simply one of the most beloved shows ever.

What do you think/hope people will feel on seeing the show?

People will laugh and cry. They will recognise themselves and those they love. It will take them on a journey that will remind them they are part of a community and are living, loving, flawed and fantastic human beings.

What made you decide that Brangian should be played by a male actor? Was it a conscious decision, even?

Oh yes, it was very conscious. I have long been angered by the obsession with beauty and feel, not only that this is not true to life, but also stops the collective imagination. When we see a pretty, thin, young girl play a virginal maid, nothing is challenged, nothing is opened, nothing is revealed. When I give this part to a large middle aged man, the opposite happens. We laugh at him/her, and then we imagine, and then we feel. This brute becomes so frail and so vulnerable that it breaks our hearts. This is something you can only do on stage. On film, it would be weird, but here, in the world of the imagination, the audience can be transported, surprised and deeply moved.

Photos from Kneehigh’s 2003 production.

Discover more about Kneehigh’s productions on the Kneehigh Cookbook.

Tristan & Yseult will play at the Globe from Tuesday 13 – Saturday 24 June. Book tickets.

Introducing The Winter SelectionWe’re delighted to announce the…

Introducing The Winter Selection

We’re delighted to
announce the 2017/18 winter season in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, The Winter Selection.

The season opens
with Romantics
Anonymous
, a new musical directed
by Emma Rice, with book written by Emma Rice, lyrics by Christopher Dimond, and music by Michael Kooman, presented by special
arrangement with Radio Mouse
Entertainment. 

This will be followed by The Secret Theatre, a new
play by Anders Lustgarten, directed
by Matthew Dunster, and Apocalypse
Meow: Crisis is Born
, an alternative Christmas show from
post-post-modern cabaret sensation Meow
Meow.

The new year
brings a new production of All’s Well That Ends Well, directed
by Caroline Byrne, and The
Captive Queen
, a reimagining of John Dryden’s Restoration drama Aureng-zebe, directed by Barrie Rutter and co-produced with
Northern Broadsides. 

The winter season closes with Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons – A Reimagining,
created by Gyre & Gimble and
recomposed by Max Richter, and the
return of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Matchgirl and Other Happier Tales,
adapted and directed by Emma Rice, in co-production with Bristol Old Vic.

Emma Rice, Artistic Director, said:

“I’ve always seen the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse as a little box of
treats, encouraging the primal need to tell and hear stories
and inviting tales and magic to unfurl beneath the flicker of the
candles. For my final season as Artistic Director at the Globe, I knew I
wanted to present the most delicious, unique and beautiful box of
delights. The Winter Selection will take us to a singing chocolate factory
in France, the inner sanctum of Elizabeth I’s court, the dark and dangerous
world of
All’s Well That
Ends Well, the palaces of India, the
emotional depths of Vivaldi, and the tender chaos of Meow Meow’s Christmas,
before we tumble back down the rabbit hole with the return of
The Little
Matchgirl.”     


How to book

Advance Priority Booking for Patrons opens Wednesday 31 May, 12.00 noon.
Priority Booking for Friends & Patrons opens Monday 5 June, 12.00 noon.
Public Booking opens Monday 19 June, 10.00am. 

Become a Member to access Priority Booking and a range of additional benefits

Discover the full Winter Season and book tickets.

Emma Rice on The Winter Selection Artistic Director Emma Rice…

Emma Rice on The Winter Selection

Artistic Director

Emma Rice on the 2017/18 Winter Season. 

The Winter Selection is my final
season as Artistic Director at Shakespeare’s Globe, and it will be full of
treats. It is sometimes easy to forget that theatre is a joyful indulgence; a
night out to be told a story, to be entertained, gripped, amused and
challenged. As a child, I remember vividly that a trip to the theatre was
intoxicating and thrilling. We planned it, looked forward to it, then, when the
night came, put on our best clothes and entered the dark world of ‘what ifs?’

The Sam
Wanamaker Playhouse is the most delicious, the most unique, and most beautiful
box of delights there is. Magical and intimate, ancient and immediate, this is
the ultimate place to be transported back to a state of wonder, to the primal
need to tell and hear stories, and to a world of rare human interaction. And
this season, transport you we will!

The Winter Selection will take you to
a singing chocolate factory in France, the inner sanctum of Elizabeth I’s
court, the dark and dangerous world of All’s
Well That Ends Well
, the palaces of India, the emotional depths of
Vivaldi, and the tender chaos of Meow Meow’s Christmas, before we tumble back
down the rabbit hole with the return of The
Little Matchgirl
.

I have
assembled some of my favourite artists and matched them with the theatrical flavours I
hunger for. I believe we are in for the most sumptuous, surprising, heartfelt and
touching of seasons.

Join us,
join me, and pick and mix as many delights as you can. We can’t wait to make these
tempting theatre treats, and I can’t wait to savour and share them all with
you.

Advance Priority Booking for Patrons opens Wednesday 31 May, 12.00 noon.
Priority Booking for Friends & Patrons opens Monday 5 June, 12.00 noon.
Public Booking opens Monday 19 June, 10.00am.

Become a Member to access Priority Booking and a range of additional benefits

Discover the full Winter Season and book tickets.

Tristan & Yseult on tour: In photosKneehigh’s critically…

Tristan & Yseult on tour: In photos

Kneehigh’s critically acclaimed production of Tristan & Yseult is currently on a national tour. The production, directed by our Artistic Director Emma Rice, will play at the Globe from Tuesday 13 until Saturday 24 June 2017. 

See who’s playing who in our cast list.

Book tickets.

(Image credits: Steve Tanner)