Category: Globe Education

Our Theatre. On the 12th of July the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse…

Our Theatre. 

On the 12th of July the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse will be surrendered to a pair of warring Dukes; a flock of love-sick shepherds; some aristocrats with a penchant for cross-dressing; a man who likes to set fire to things; a really miserable poet; a forest; a deer; and an entirely unexpected lion.

Oh, and 62 school children.

This piece of merry mania is part of Our Theatre, a community project supported by the Harris Foundation for Lifelong Learning, which will see three mainstream secondary schools, one special educational needs school and one adult drama group perform everyone’s favourite sheep-centric Shakespearean comedy, As You Like It. All of the groups are based in the borough of Southwark, and they will perform the play in their school or community spaces, and in the Globe’s Sam Wanamaker Playhouse (notable for its Jacobean, gold-rimmed gorgeousness, but also – this week – for its really excellent air conditioning).

The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse performance will see each group perform a single act of the play, with the dramatis personae being provided by:

Act 1 – Sacred Heart Catholic School

Act 2 – The People’s Company

Act 3 – Spa School (whose in-school performance featured a bubble machine, which should be a compulsory element of all performances of Shakespeare from now on).

Act 4 – University Academy of Engineering South Bank

Act 5 – ARK Walworth Academy

The groups have been rehearsing for the last eleven weeks (under the expert tutelage of their school drama teachers, and of the Globe Education Practitioner assigned to each group), and this process has been documented by 16 undergraduate photography students from London South Bank University, whose work will be on display as an exhibition alongside the performance on Thursday.

Our Theatre is a fabulous opportunity for young people (and not so young people) to perform in front of an audience in a professional theatre; to become familiar with a complete Shakespeare play (Shakespeare has – alongside a few other accolades – the distinction of being the only named author on the GCSE syllabus); and to meet and mix with other people from across their home borough. We were all incredibly proud of this (and rightly so), but then we read a bit of the programme submitted by Simon Humphreys, the Head of Drama at Spa School (a school for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders), which made us all think a bit:

“Many people believe Autism prevents emotional attachment, and impedes social behaviour, but I know that my students completely negate that with their honest and empathetic performances, that hopefully will stay with you long after the show, and inform your future friendships with autistic people”

Much as we love to do our bit for the cause of opening up the worlds of Shakespeare and theatre (and we love it very much), we hope that Our Theatre will be able to achieve something even more.

Photography: Our Theatre 2016, Cesare De Giglio 

On being a Globe Education Assistant. Our Globe Education…

On being a Globe Education Assistant. 

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

Here Dorothy McDowell, a Globe Education Assistant in the Learning Projects team, talks about her experiences on the programme this summer. 

In my last two years at school, I switched my choice of degree subject once; country of study twice; and actual university roughly every hour, on the hour – but the idea of a gap year never seriously occurred to me. I like drama, I like books and I like writing: it was university or bust. Then, in the middle of my sentence of death-by-prolonged-study-leave, my mother suddenly turned round, job advert column in hand, and said:

“Would you fancy working at the Globe Theatre?”

The answer to this was an unequivocal ‘yes’ – I come from a small village in rural Northern Ireland, and anyone familiar with small villages in rural Northern Ireland will tell you that the nearest thing they have to an arts industry is a country-and-western tribute act, and a slightly contentious marching band. So, I threw my mind back to summer holidays spent standing in the rain at arts festivals trying to persuade visitors not to touch the cows; raked up a few anecdotes; and applied.

I then spent the next month determinedly telling people that I didn’t actually expect to get the job and I just thought it would be funny to apply, okay? This became slightly more challenging when I got an email inviting me to a Skype interview; followed by a second invitation, to fly over to London; and finally a phone call telling me that I had got the job. I am now the proud owner of the title of ‘Globe Education Assistant – Learning Projects (Community)’; I have a place at Oxford; I have seen 38 shows since September; and if you sit still for long enough I will recite a brief performance history of All’s Well That Ends Well at you.

When people ask me what my job entails, I find that the best approach is to check that they don’t have anywhere urgent they need to be before starting in – it is too varied for me to be able to promise that I’ll finish in time for someone to catch the next bus.

Some days I type up so many spreadsheets that I am able to astound all beholders with my encyclopaedic knowledge of the differing views on Oberon as held by the under 5s; other days I find myself  requesting that someone mind this drum while I go to the basement to look for some confetti and a lion mask.

The project that’s uppermost in my mind at the moment is ‘Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank’. In the course of the pre-show marketing I called and spoke to almost every Special Educational Needs school in London, helping to increase the number of pupils with special educational needs who were able to attend the show. My role during the actual run of the show was to hand out programmes to the assembled school groups – a job which began with a radio call that could be roughly translated as, “More children than you can possibly imagine have just arrived on the Southbank” and ended with me running up and down Bankside in a high-vis jacket.

image

But my absolute favourite bit of the job is the Southwark Youth Theatre. I am their Company Manager, and spend Saturday mornings alternating between joining in with their drama games (at which I am unforgivably terrible) and trying to work out the most dignified way to carry three drums and a life-sized throne up a flight of stairs.

I am not, I must confess, a huge fan of overflowing sentiment. There is much to be said for the sight of children who have never been in a theatre before standing onstage in A Concert for Winter, or for classes of teenagers cheering for Beatrice and Benedick; but I will always try to avoid saying it. But I will say this: ten months ago I had never set foot in the Globe theatre. I am not intrepid; I am not well-connected; I had never had a job before. I applied for this on a whim; something I would like to do, but something I did not stand a chance of getting.

Two months later, I stood on the banks of the River Thames – with the moon rising in the background, and St Paul’s reflected in the water behind me – looking up at the most beautiful theatre in the world.

Applications will re-open next year, please keep an eye on our website for details. 

Your chance to be a Globe Education Assistant Our Globe…

Your chance to be a Globe Education Assistant 

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

We are currently looking for school leavers who would like to develop careers in the arts or education for our Globe Education Assistant roles. For a full job description and to apply, please visit the Jobs page of our website.

The deadline for applications is Monday 4 June at 5pm.

Shiri Fileman, a Globe Education Assistant in the Events team, shares her experiences of working at the Globe. 


I’m not sure there are adequate words to describe what my time at the Globe has been like so far. If you are thinking of becoming a Globe Education Assistant (GEA) read on to get the inside scoop.

To give you some context, I stumbled across this role whilst in my first year of applying to drama schools, and immediately pounced on the idea that this could be my job for a whole year.

I work in the Events team, and we deal with all public events. This can range from the Read Not Dead staged readings, lectures on a myriad of topics and Family Storytelling Festivals. No one day is the same, and the challenges can range from running a production on one of the most beautiful stages, to ensuring there are enough pizzas for everyone to eat (don’t worry as a GEA you get pizza too). The variety of work I do is so huge and exciting, I find it hard not to brag about my job to everyone I meet.

Recently, the Events team finished working with the Higher Education team to put on the Sam Wanamaker Festival. This is an enormous celebration of all the UK, and some International Drama Schools, who come together to perform Shakespeare and his contemporaries on the Globe Stage. It is a crazy weekend full of learning, fun, and lots of hummus, KitKats and wine. I was on my feet constantly, but have never left a weekend at work with a bigger grin on my face. There were so many hilarious moments, and I got to know the students really well. It’s something else to experience that festival and be in that space.

However, this job isn’t just exclusive to performers or people who want to make a career out of performing. You will be working with and hosting lecturers in Shakespeare Studies from universities all over the world, talking to them and listening to their research.

One of the most incredible things about working at the Globe is the fantastic people who work around you. Everyone has such a unique background and brings something immensely special to the building. You always feel surrounded by endless heaps of talent.

There is never a moment when you are the child of the team, or treated any differently. You are an integral part of the building and everyone treats you that way. I’m not sure I’ve gone a single day without being greeted by smiles in every doorway, (or when making the tenth tea of the day in the Green Room). Of course I am biased, but my team is made up of the most incredible individuals who constantly amaze me with their kindness and talent.

We are now on the magical adventure of the Summer Season. We have dived head first into the bulk of the events calendar, with fantastic panels and discussions on censorship in theatre with leading producers, academics and actors, followed by the Read Not Dead readings, Q&As, talks and study courses, all before tumbling into the huge Shakespeare’s Telling Tales family storytelling festival. And that’s just up to July!

This job gives you so many transferable skills. As someone who wants to act, much of my life and career will be uncertain from here in. I thought I had a step-by-step plan for my life, and if that had actually worked out I’d never have made it to where I am now. The Globe has given me so many things that can I can take to all walks of life, and help me feel prepared to go on to do whatever I want to do.

One of the most useful skills I now have is finance management. I honestly thought I would never understand finance, but a big part of my job is managing expenditure and income and ensuring that everything is accounted for. If you read the word finance and started internally crying, don’t worry. I felt the same way and it isn’t the whole job. There are so many other fun parts too.  I’m only at my desk about half of the time and there can never be a dull moment. In my first week I was ironing sheets for a play in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, and in the second I was ordering a fluffy hedgehog ornament online. His name is Hedgely and he is very cute. He has now taken up permanent residence in the office. 

As a very untidy person I found having such responsibilities has helped me really find out how I work and know what is best for me.

This job has been the most amazing few months thus far. I have laughed so hard I have had to lie down from my belly hurting and cried from being so moved by the amazing work that I get to do.

Your chance to be a Globe Education Assistant Our Globe…

Your chance to be a Globe Education Assistant 

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

We are currently looking for school leavers who would like to develop careers in the arts or education for our Globe Education Assistant roles. For a full job description and to apply, please visit the Jobs page of our website.

The deadline for applications is Monday 4 June at 5pm.

Shiri Fileman, a Globe Education Assistant in the Events team, shares her experiences of working at the Globe. 


I’m not sure there are adequate words to describe what my time at the Globe has been like so far. If you are thinking of becoming a Globe Education Assistant (GEA) read on to get the inside scoop.

To give you some context, I stumbled across this role whilst in my first year of applying to drama schools, and immediately pounced on the idea that this could be my job for a whole year.

I work in the Events team, and we deal with all public events. This can range from the Read Not Dead staged readings, lectures on a myriad of topics and Family Storytelling Festivals. No one day is the same, and the challenges can range from running a production on one of the most beautiful stages, to ensuring there are enough pizzas for everyone to eat (don’t worry as a GEA you get pizza too). The variety of work I do is so huge and exciting, I find it hard not to brag about my job to everyone I meet.

Recently, the Events team finished working with the Higher Education team to put on the Sam Wanamaker Festival. This is an enormous celebration of all the UK, and some International Drama Schools, who come together to perform Shakespeare and his contemporaries on the Globe Stage. It is a crazy weekend full of learning, fun, and lots of hummus, KitKats and wine. I was on my feet constantly, but have never left a weekend at work with a bigger grin on my face. There were so many hilarious moments, and I got to know the students really well. It’s something else to experience that festival and be in that space.

However, this job isn’t just exclusive to performers or people who want to make a career out of performing. You will be working with and hosting lecturers in Shakespeare Studies from universities all over the world, talking to them and listening to their research.

One of the most incredible things about working at the Globe is the fantastic people who work around you. Everyone has such a unique background and brings something immensely special to the building. You always feel surrounded by endless heaps of talent.

There is never a moment when you are the child of the team, or treated any differently. You are an integral part of the building and everyone treats you that way. I’m not sure I’ve gone a single day without being greeted by smiles in every doorway, (or when making the tenth tea of the day in the Green Room). Of course I am biased, but my team is made up of the most incredible individuals who constantly amaze me with their kindness and talent.

We are now on the magical adventure of the Summer Season. We have dived head first into the bulk of the events calendar, with fantastic panels and discussions on censorship in theatre with leading producers, academics and actors, followed by the Read Not Dead readings, Q&As, talks and study courses, all before tumbling into the huge Shakespeare’s Telling Tales family storytelling festival. And that’s just up to July!

This job gives you so many transferable skills. As someone who wants to act, much of my life and career will be uncertain from here in. I thought I had a step-by-step plan for my life, and if that had actually worked out I’d never have made it to where I am now. The Globe has given me so many things that can I can take to all walks of life, and help me feel prepared to go on to do whatever I want to do.

One of the most useful skills I now have is finance management. I honestly thought I would never understand finance, but a big part of my job is managing expenditure and income and ensuring that everything is accounted for. If you read the word finance and started internally crying, don’t worry. I felt the same way and it isn’t the whole job. There are so many other fun parts too.  I’m only at my desk about half of the time and there can never be a dull moment. In my first week I was ironing sheets for a play in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, and in the second I was ordering a fluffy hedgehog ornament online. His name is Hedgely and he is very cute. He has now taken up permanent residence in the office. 

As a very untidy person I found having such responsibilities has helped me really find out how I work and know what is best for me.

This job has been the most amazing few months thus far. I have laughed so hard I have had to lie down from my belly hurting and cried from being so moved by the amazing work that I get to do.

Leaving school and want to work at the Globe? On being a Globe…

Leaving school and want to work at the Globe? On being a Globe Education Assistant

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

Here Dorothy McDowell, a Globe Education Assistant in the Learning Projects team, talks about her experiences of the programme so far.


In my last two years at school, I switched my choice of degree subject once; country of study twice; and actual university roughly every hour, on the hour – but the idea of a gap year never seriously occurred to me. I like drama, I like books and I like writing: it was university or bust. Then, in the middle of my sentence of death-by-prolonged-study-leave, my mother suddenly turned round, job advert column in hand, and said:

“Would you fancy working at the Globe Theatre?”

The answer to this was an unequivocal ‘yes’ – I come from a small village in rural Northern Ireland, and anyone familiar with small villages in rural Northern Ireland will tell you that the nearest thing they have to an arts industry is a country-and-western tribute act, and a slightly contentious marching band. So, I threw my mind back to summer holidays spent standing in the rain at arts festivals trying to persuade visitors not to touch the cows; raked up a few anecdotes; and applied.

I then spent the next month determinedly telling people that I didn’t actually expect to get the job and I just thought it would be funny to apply, okay? This became slightly more challenging when I got an email inviting me to a Skype interview; followed by a second invitation, to fly over to London; and finally a phone call telling me that I had got the job. I am now the proud owner of the title of ‘Globe Education Assistant – Learning Projects (Community)’; I have a place at Oxford; I have seen 38 shows since September; and if you sit still for long enough I will recite a brief performance history of All’s Well That Ends Well at you.

When people ask me what my job entails, I find the best approach is to check they don’t have anywhere urgent they need to be before I start. It is so varied a concise answer is almost impossible.

Some days I type up so many spreadsheets that I am able to astound people with my encyclopaedic knowledge of the differing views on Oberon as held by the under 5s; other days I hear myself saying things like, “Please can you mind this drum I’m going to the basement to look for some confetti and a lion mask”.

The project that’s uppermost in my mind at the moment is the famed ‘Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank’. In the course of the pre-show marketing I called and spoke to almost every Special Educational Needs school in London which helped increase the number of pupils with special educational needs who were able to attend the show.

My role during the actual run of the show was to hand out programmes to the assembled school groups – a job which began with a radio call that could be roughly translated as, “More children than you can possibly imagine have just arrived on the Southbank” and ended with me running up and down Bankside in a high-vis jacket.

But my absolute favourite bit of the job is the Southwark Youth Theatre. I am their Company Manager, and spend Saturday mornings alternating between joining in with their drama games (at which I am unforgivably terrible) and getting myself heard above their excited hubbub.

On reflecting on my role at the Globe I find myself uncharacteristically soppy. There is much to be said for the sight of children who have never been in a theatre before standing onstage in A Concert for Winter, or for classes of teenagers cheering for Beatrice and Benedick. Ten months ago I had never set foot in the Globe Theatre. I am not intrepid; I am not well-connected; I had never had a job before. I applied for this on a whim; something I would like to do, but something I did not think I had a chance of getting.

Two months later, I stood on the banks of the River Thames – with the moon rising in the background, and St Paul’s reflected in the water behind me – looking up at the most beautiful theatre in the world.

Leaving school and want to work at the Globe? On being a Globe…

Leaving school and want to work at the Globe? On being a Globe Education Assistant

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

Here Dorothy McDowell, a Globe Education Assistant in the Learning Projects team, talks about her experiences of the programme so far.


In my last two years at school, I switched my choice of degree subject once; country of study twice; and actual university roughly every hour, on the hour – but the idea of a gap year never seriously occurred to me. I like drama, I like books and I like writing: it was university or bust. Then, in the middle of my sentence of death-by-prolonged-study-leave, my mother suddenly turned round, job advert column in hand, and said:

“Would you fancy working at the Globe Theatre?”

The answer to this was an unequivocal ‘yes’ – I come from a small village in rural Northern Ireland, and anyone familiar with small villages in rural Northern Ireland will tell you that the nearest thing they have to an arts industry is a country-and-western tribute act, and a slightly contentious marching band. So, I threw my mind back to summer holidays spent standing in the rain at arts festivals trying to persuade visitors not to touch the cows; raked up a few anecdotes; and applied.

I then spent the next month determinedly telling people that I didn’t actually expect to get the job and I just thought it would be funny to apply, okay? This became slightly more challenging when I got an email inviting me to a Skype interview; followed by a second invitation, to fly over to London; and finally a phone call telling me that I had got the job. I am now the proud owner of the title of ‘Globe Education Assistant – Learning Projects (Community)’; I have a place at Oxford; I have seen 38 shows since September; and if you sit still for long enough I will recite a brief performance history of All’s Well That Ends Well at you.

When people ask me what my job entails, I find the best approach is to check they don’t have anywhere urgent they need to be before I start. It is so varied a concise answer is almost impossible.

Some days I type up so many spreadsheets that I am able to astound people with my encyclopaedic knowledge of the differing views on Oberon as held by the under 5s; other days I hear myself saying things like, “Please can you mind this drum I’m going to the basement to look for some confetti and a lion mask”.

The project that’s uppermost in my mind at the moment is the famed ‘Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank’. In the course of the pre-show marketing I called and spoke to almost every Special Educational Needs school in London which helped increase the number of pupils with special educational needs who were able to attend the show.

My role during the actual run of the show was to hand out programmes to the assembled school groups – a job which began with a radio call that could be roughly translated as, “More children than you can possibly imagine have just arrived on the Southbank” and ended with me running up and down Bankside in a high-vis jacket.

But my absolute favourite bit of the job is the Southwark Youth Theatre. I am their Company Manager, and spend Saturday mornings alternating between joining in with their drama games (at which I am unforgivably terrible) and getting myself heard above their excited hubbub.

On reflecting on my role at the Globe I find myself uncharacteristically soppy. There is much to be said for the sight of children who have never been in a theatre before standing onstage in A Concert for Winter, or for classes of teenagers cheering for Beatrice and Benedick. Ten months ago I had never set foot in the Globe Theatre. I am not intrepid; I am not well-connected; I had never had a job before. I applied for this on a whim; something I would like to do, but something I did not think I had a chance of getting.

Two months later, I stood on the banks of the River Thames – with the moon rising in the background, and St Paul’s reflected in the water behind me – looking up at the most beautiful theatre in the world.

Costume and Cosmetics at the Globe Delivered in partnership with…

Costume and Cosmetics at the Globe 

Delivered in partnership with King’s College London, our MA in Shakespeare Studies offers exciting and unparalleled opportunities for Shakespeare students. Drawing on the joint expertise of Shakespeare’s Globe and King’s, students learn about the texts, companies and theatre spaces of early modern playhouses, just a stone’s throw from where Shakespeare’s plays were originally performed.

Current MA student Kate Bauer reflects on discovering how costume and cosmetics are used at the Globe.


Even as the sun begins to linger a little longer in the evenings, our classes with the Shakespeare’s Globe have finally walked off into the sunset.

Well, it certainly sounds like I’ve been reading too many sonnets recently.

Moving over from Ireland to study this course has been one of the best decisions of my life and has expanded my mind in all things Shakespearean whilst making some wonderful connections along the way! Even after finding out we Irish ‘savages’ are not so nicely referenced in most sixteenth-century drama, I found this to be a wonderfully welcoming experience delving into the world of Shakespeare.

Costumes and clothes have always been an integral part of staging Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Having worked on some of the very first Globe productions, costume designer Hattie Barsby allowed us quite literally to step into the garments of the past in her session on Dressing Shakespeare’s Actors! She showed our class the exceptional design and craftsmanship that goes into each item, and who doesn’t love a good dress-up?

We ended our wonderful term on Staging Shakespeare in Early Modern Playhouses with a seminar on cosmetics in the early modern period. Dr Farah Karim Cooper, Head of Higher Education and Research, began with an insightful lecture followed by a make-up demonstration given by Pam Humpage. She showed us how to apply the cosmetics used in ‘Original Practices’ productions at the Globe which aim to only use products available at the time. Their research of the period is coupled with their creative handiwork to manufacture a possible glimpse into the past.

Farah highlighted the constant debate surrounding make-up in the period; Elizabethans loved a natural, glowing complexion but often looked down upon a woman making use of products, such as crushed pearl or even deadly ingredients like lead, to achieve such an appearance. My personal favourite trick was how women painted blue veins on to their necks – make-up enthusiasts please take note!

Feeding this workshop into our research was hugely supportive as we studied the early modern attitude to how ‘the clothes doth make the man’ and how your clothes designated your social position.

Carrying on into the new summer season, this notion of the clothes making the man is even more exciting when we consider the current productions of Hamlet and As You Like It.

Michelle Terry, the Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe, leads the cast of Hamlet in the titular role, playing the Prince of Elsinore himself. A male actor, Shubham Saraf steps into the watery shoes of Hamlet’s love, the fair Ophelia. Many of the great roles in the two productions are similarly ‘cross-cast’ which creates an exciting opportunity for the audience to see a fresh side to this iconic play.

Deaf actor, Nadia Nadarajah, speaking of taking on the role of Hamlet’s pal Guildenstern, says there is ‘Shakespearean English and British Sign Language wrestling to find a fit’ in this production. This inclusion of a wider area of communicative methods reflects the growing concern for representation on the Shakespearean stage.

For further reading on cosmetics and clothing in the early modern period see:

Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass, Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2000)

Farah Karim-Cooper, Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama (Edinburgh University Press, 2006)

Applications for the MA in Shakespeare Studies starting in September 2018 are now open. Read more and make your application.

Costume and Cosmetics at the Globe Delivered in partnership with…

Costume and Cosmetics at the Globe 

Delivered in partnership with King’s College London, our MA in Shakespeare Studies offers exciting and unparalleled opportunities for Shakespeare students. Drawing on the joint expertise of Shakespeare’s Globe and King’s, students learn about the texts, companies and theatre spaces of early modern playhouses, just a stone’s throw from where Shakespeare’s plays were originally performed.

Current MA student Kate Bauer reflects on discovering how costume and cosmetics are used at the Globe.


Even as the sun begins to linger a little longer in the evenings, our classes with the Shakespeare’s Globe have finally walked off into the sunset.

Well, it certainly sounds like I’ve been reading too many sonnets recently.

Moving over from Ireland to study this course has been one of the best decisions of my life and has expanded my mind in all things Shakespearean whilst making some wonderful connections along the way! Even after finding out we Irish ‘savages’ are not so nicely referenced in most sixteenth-century drama, I found this to be a wonderfully welcoming experience delving into the world of Shakespeare.

Costumes and clothes have always been an integral part of staging Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Having worked on some of the very first Globe productions, costume designer Hattie Barsby allowed us quite literally to step into the garments of the past in her session on Dressing Shakespeare’s Actors! She showed our class the exceptional design and craftsmanship that goes into each item, and who doesn’t love a good dress-up?

We ended our wonderful term on Staging Shakespeare in Early Modern Playhouses with a seminar on cosmetics in the early modern period. Dr Farah Karim Cooper, Head of Higher Education and Research, began with an insightful lecture followed by a make-up demonstration given by Pam Humpage. She showed us how to apply the cosmetics used in ‘Original Practices’ productions at the Globe which aim to only use products available at the time. Their research of the period is coupled with their creative handiwork to manufacture a possible glimpse into the past.

Farah highlighted the constant debate surrounding make-up in the period; Elizabethans loved a natural, glowing complexion but often looked down upon a woman making use of products, such as crushed pearl or even deadly ingredients like lead, to achieve such an appearance. My personal favourite trick was how women painted blue veins on to their necks – make-up enthusiasts please take note!

Feeding this workshop into our research was hugely supportive as we studied the early modern attitude to how ‘the clothes doth make the man’ and how your clothes designated your social position.

Carrying on into the new summer season, this notion of the clothes making the man is even more exciting when we consider the current productions of Hamlet and As You Like It.

Michelle Terry, the Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe, leads the cast of Hamlet in the titular role, playing the Prince of Elsinore himself. A male actor, Shubham Saraf steps into the watery shoes of Hamlet’s love, the fair Ophelia. Many of the great roles in the two productions are similarly ‘cross-cast’ which creates an exciting opportunity for the audience to see a fresh side to this iconic play.

Deaf actor, Nadia Nadarajah, speaking of taking on the role of Hamlet’s pal Guildenstern, says there is ‘Shakespearean English and British Sign Language wrestling to find a fit’ in this production. This inclusion of a wider area of communicative methods reflects the growing concern for representation on the Shakespearean stage.

For further reading on cosmetics and clothing in the early modern period see:

Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass, Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2000)

Farah Karim-Cooper, Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama (Edinburgh University Press, 2006)

Applications for the MA in Shakespeare Studies starting in September 2018 are now open. Read more and make your application.

Plays, concerts, research and personal development as a Globe…

Plays, concerts, research and personal development as a Globe Education Assistant 

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

Here Layla Savage, a Globe Education Assistant in the Learning Projects team, talks about her experiences of the programme so far.

When I applied for the Globe Education Assistant position, I did it on a bit of a whim. If I got the job – great; if I didn’t then I would be off to university. To be honest, I wasn’t too sure about going to university. I was definitely going to go, but something just didn’t seem right. Maybe it was the course, maybe it was the place, or maybe it just wasn’t the right time…Either way, come September I was not moving on to university, but rather starting an exciting new job at Shakespeare’s Globe!

Working as part of the Learning Projects team for the past nine months has been a great experience, not only have I been providing support and assistance to the team, but have also had my own responsibilities and as sense of ownership over certain projects. The main project that I have worked on is Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank, in which we stage a 90 minute Shakespeare play (this year was Much Ado About Nothing) and give out thousands of FREE tickets to secondary school students in London and Birmingham. My role in this project was to support the work of the project team (for instance, taking minutes at regular meetings), and to take the lead on scheduling the practical workshops our practitioners deliver to school groups before they come to see the performance.  

One of my favourite things about my job is the diversity – every day is different! During the madness of Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank, we would be outside by the River Thames every day, herding over a thousand students and teachers into the Globe, some days I am putting together story sacks, filled with colourful and exciting puppets and instruments to make Shakespeare come alive to primary school children. Other days are more desk-based, consisting of putting together databases or doing some research. One of my favourite projects was A Concert for Winter, which is our annual winter concert for community groups in Southwark to take part in. It was so lovely and heart-warming to see such a range of people from the local area come together to celebrate with each other, many performing songs that they had written themselves. This was also great fun as all the Globe Education Assistants were supporting as stage managers for the day, which was great fun. It was truly a beautiful day!

Finally, I have had so many great opportunities at Shakespeare’s Globe and have gained so much confidence and independence throughout the year. I’ve had time to reflect on my next steps, and after a bit of drama about what I would end up doing next year, I have finally made a decision that I am happy with. I have had conversations with so many people, and have learnt something from everyone I’ve met at the Globe. Each of the Education Assistants were also given a mentor at the start of the year, and I cannot thank my mentor enough for all the help and support that she has given me, from sorting out what I would do about university, to talking about how I can be more organised, and setting up a chat for me with one of the producers here at the Globe, it is great to have people you can turn to.

For anyone thinking of applying for the Globe Education Assistant position, you’d be foolish not to!

We are currently looking for school leavers who would like to develop careers in the arts or education for our Globe Education Assistant roles. For a full job description and to apply, please visit the Jobs page of our website. 

Plays, concerts, research and personal development as a Globe…

Plays, concerts, research and personal development as a Globe Education Assistant 

Our Globe Education Assistant roles offer school leavers an exciting opportunity to gain invaluable experience working in a leading arts organisation. Through supporting the daily activities of the Education department for one year, they develop key skills in administration, communication and team work in a supportive environment, and make a valuable contribution to the work of the Globe.

Here Layla Savage, a Globe Education Assistant in the Learning Projects team, talks about her experiences of the programme so far.

When I applied for the Globe Education Assistant position, I did it on a bit of a whim. If I got the job – great; if I didn’t then I would be off to university. To be honest, I wasn’t too sure about going to university. I was definitely going to go, but something just didn’t seem right. Maybe it was the course, maybe it was the place, or maybe it just wasn’t the right time…Either way, come September I was not moving on to university, but rather starting an exciting new job at Shakespeare’s Globe!

Working as part of the Learning Projects team for the past nine months has been a great experience, not only have I been providing support and assistance to the team, but have also had my own responsibilities and as sense of ownership over certain projects. The main project that I have worked on is Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank, in which we stage a 90 minute Shakespeare play (this year was Much Ado About Nothing) and give out thousands of FREE tickets to secondary school students in London and Birmingham. My role in this project was to support the work of the project team (for instance, taking minutes at regular meetings), and to take the lead on scheduling the practical workshops our practitioners deliver to school groups before they come to see the performance.  

One of my favourite things about my job is the diversity – every day is different! During the madness of Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank, we would be outside by the River Thames every day, herding over a thousand students and teachers into the Globe, some days I am putting together story sacks, filled with colourful and exciting puppets and instruments to make Shakespeare come alive to primary school children. Other days are more desk-based, consisting of putting together databases or doing some research. One of my favourite projects was A Concert for Winter, which is our annual winter concert for community groups in Southwark to take part in. It was so lovely and heart-warming to see such a range of people from the local area come together to celebrate with each other, many performing songs that they had written themselves. This was also great fun as all the Globe Education Assistants were supporting as stage managers for the day, which was great fun. It was truly a beautiful day!

Finally, I have had so many great opportunities at Shakespeare’s Globe and have gained so much confidence and independence throughout the year. I’ve had time to reflect on my next steps, and after a bit of drama about what I would end up doing next year, I have finally made a decision that I am happy with. I have had conversations with so many people, and have learnt something from everyone I’ve met at the Globe. Each of the Education Assistants were also given a mentor at the start of the year, and I cannot thank my mentor enough for all the help and support that she has given me, from sorting out what I would do about university, to talking about how I can be more organised, and setting up a chat for me with one of the producers here at the Globe, it is great to have people you can turn to.

For anyone thinking of applying for the Globe Education Assistant position, you’d be foolish not to!

We are currently looking for school leavers who would like to develop careers in the arts or education for our Globe Education Assistant roles. For a full job description and to apply, please visit the Jobs page of our website.