Category: Shakespeare’s Globe

#ArchiveWeek. Did you know we have an archive?  Inspired by the…

#ArchiveWeek. 

Did you know we have an archive?  

Inspired by the Archives and Records Association between 17-27 November 2018 we will be opening the vaults, diving in and sharing some of the best bits covering the following themes:

Saturday 17 November – #MusicArchives
Sunday 18 November – #ReligiousArchives
Monday 19 November – #ArchiveAnniversaries
Tuesday 20 November – #HairyArchives
Wednesday 21 November – #MaritimeArchives
Thursday 22 November – #DiversityArchives
Friday 23 November – #ArchiveAnimals
Saturday 24 November – #SportingArchives
Sunday 25 November – #InternationalArchives

See our findings on Twitter and maybe on Instagram.

#ArchiveWeek. Did you know we have an archive?  Inspired by the…

#ArchiveWeek. 

Did you know we have an archive?  

Inspired by the Archives and Records Association between 17-27 November 2018 we will be opening the vaults, diving in and sharing some of the best bits covering the following themes:

Saturday 17 November – #MusicArchives
Sunday 18 November – #ReligiousArchives
Monday 19 November – #ArchiveAnniversaries
Tuesday 20 November – #HairyArchives
Wednesday 21 November – #MaritimeArchives
Thursday 22 November – #DiversityArchives
Friday 23 November – #ArchiveAnimals
Saturday 24 November – #SportingArchives
Sunday 25 November – #InternationalArchives

See our findings on Twitter and maybe on Instagram.

Love Theatre Day 2018 – what to expect.14 November is Love…

Love Theatre Day 2018 – what to expect.

14 November is Love Theatre Day where we will be celebrating all things theatre and giving you a glimpse behind the scenes of what goes on at the Globe.

Did you know ‘the Globe’ as we call it actually comprises two theatres – the Globe Theatre and the indoor, candlelit Sam Wanamaker Playhouse – and lots of other, slightly less glamorous buildings? 

Follow us on Twitter @The_Globe

What to expect today: 

#Backstage (10am to 12pm): go behind the scenes and get a glimpse of working life at the Globe.

#Showtime (7pm to 10pm): join us backstage in the moments before a show. 

Every day is Love Theatre Day at the Globe so stay with us for exclusive insights into our world across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

Love Theatre Day 2018 – what to expect.14 November is Love…

Love Theatre Day 2018 – what to expect.

14 November is Love Theatre Day where we will be celebrating all things theatre and giving you a glimpse behind the scenes of what goes on at the Globe.

Did you know ‘the Globe’ as we call it actually comprises two theatres – the Globe Theatre and the indoor, candlelit Sam Wanamaker Playhouse – and lots of other, slightly less glamorous buildings? 

Follow us on Twitter @The_Globe

What to expect today: 

#Backstage (10am to 12pm): go behind the scenes and get a glimpse of working life at the Globe.

#Showtime (7pm to 10pm): join us backstage in the moments before a show. 

Every day is Love Theatre Day at the Globe so stay with us for exclusive insights into our world across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

Halloween inspiration from Shakespeare’s Globe

Are you looking for an antidote to the truly terrifying ‘sexy’ Handmaid’s Tale outfits you’re bound to encounter this year?

Why not really scare the patriarchy by donning blue and dressing like our favourite ‘guilty feminist’/ 16th-century poet, Emilia Bassano, brought to vivid life on the Globe stage earlier this year by Leah Harvey, Vinnette Robinson and Clare Perkins in Morgan Lloyd Malcolm’s Emilia.

For the introverts who still want to party we’d suggest taking inspiration from the crows in Eyam. Just don’t tell your friends your appearance means the plague is coming. The highly impractical beaks are also great for those trying to avoid hoovering up all the Halloween snacks.

Have you enacted every Harry Potter character for the last seven years and are now looking for a new magical twist? May we suggest Hermione from The Winter’s Tale?

Is she a woman? Is she a statue? Didn’t she die?! Is she a ghost?  How did she stand still for so long?!  The main component of this costume is the ability to stand still for long periods of time then ‘come to life’ at the precise moment your ex lifts a glass of red wine to their lips.

Those suffering from existential dread can channel the Prince of Darkness himself. No, not Alice Cooper, but everyone’s favourite maudlin young man, Hamlet. Just wear your own clothes for this one and leave a trail of heartbreak in your wake.

Get yourself down to the florist for a bunch of symbolic flowers, or at the very least grab some rosemary from the herb garden and tout the sweetest-smelling, but saddest costume of all.

Costuming as a couple? Forget Romeo and Juliet to play with your wardrobes and words as you transform yourselves into Rosalind and Orlando and do Halloween As You Like It.

Imagery: 

Emilia photographed by Helen Murray. Designed by Jo Scotcher. 
Crow costume sketches for Eyam by Hannah Clark 
The Winter’s Tale photographed by Marc Brenner. Designed by James Perkins.
Hamlet photographed by Tristram Kenton. Designed by Ellan Parry. 
As You Like It photographed by Tristram Kenton. Designed by Ellan Parry.

Halloween inspiration from Shakespeare’s Globe

Are you looking for an antidote to the truly terrifying ‘sexy’ Handmaid’s Tale outfits you’re bound to encounter this year?

Why not really scare the patriarchy by donning blue and dressing like our favourite ‘guilty feminist’/ 16th-century poet, Emilia Bassano, brought to vivid life on the Globe stage earlier this year by Leah Harvey, Vinnette Robinson and Clare Perkins in Morgan Lloyd Malcolm’s Emilia.

image

For the introverts who still want to party we’d suggest taking inspiration from the crows in Eyam. Just don’t tell your friends your appearance means the plague is coming. The highly impractical beaks are also great for those trying to avoid hoovering up all the Halloween snacks.

image

Have you enacted every Harry Potter character for the last seven years and are now looking for a new costume with a magical twist? May we suggest Hermione from The Winter’s Tale?

Is she a woman? Is she a statue? Didn’t she die?! Is she a ghost?  How did she stand still for so long?!  The main component of this costume is the ability to stand still for long periods of time then ‘come to life’ at the precise moment your ex lifts a glass of red wine to their lips.

image

Those suffering from existential dread can channel the Prince of Darkness himself. No, not Alice Cooper, but everyone’s favourite maudlin young man, Hamlet. Just wear your own clothes for this one and leave a trail of heartbreak in your wake.

image

Get yourself down to the florist for a bunch of symbolic flowers, or at the very least grab some rosemary from the herb garden and tout the sweetest-smelling, but saddest costume of all.

image

Costuming as a couple? Forget Romeo and Juliet to play with your wardrobes and words as you transform yourselves into Rosalind and Orlando and do Halloween As You Like It.

image

Imagery: 

Emilia photographed by Helen Murray. Designed by Jo Scotcher. 
Crow costume sketches for Eyam by Hannah Clark 
The Winter’s Tale photographed by Marc Brenner. Designed by James Perkins.
Hamlet photographed by Tristram Kenton. Designed by Ellan Parry. 
As You Like It photographed by Tristram Kenton. Designed by Ellan Parry.

Sonnet 141

In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes,
For they in thee a thousand errors note;
But ‘tis my heart that loves what they despise,
Who in despite of view is pleased to dote;
Nor are mine ears with thy tongue’s tune delighted,
Nor tender feeling, to base touches prone,
Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited
To any sensual feast with thee alone:
But my five wits nor my five senses can
Dissuade one foolish heart from serving thee,
Who leaves unsway’d the likeness of a man,
Thy proud hearts slave and vassal wretch to be:
Only my plague thus far I count my gain,
That she that makes me sin awards me pain.

Sonnet 141.

In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes,
For they in thee a thousand errors note;
But ‘tis my heart that loves what they despise,
Who in despite of view is pleased to dote;
Nor are mine ears with thy tongue’s tune delighted,
Nor tender feeling, to base touches prone,
Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited
To any sensual feast with thee alone:
But my five wits nor my five senses can
Dissuade one foolish heart from serving thee,
Who leaves unsway’d the likeness of a man,
Thy proud hearts slave and vassal wretch to be:
Only my plague thus far I count my gain,
That she that makes me sin awards me pain.

The true beginning of our end: Summer 2018 memories.The end of…

The true beginning of our end: Summer 2018 memories.

The end of summer is always bittersweet, but we are lucky that when the summer season closes on 14 October our shows will take place in the cosy, candlelit Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

But, it’s not over yet!

Before we close the doors of the ‘Wooden O’ we want to share some of our highlights with you. We’d love to hear from you too. You can tweet us, post on our Facebook page or comment on Instagram.

image

We were watching the Midnight Matinee of Othello and it was like we were transported to a different time and place altogether. Even though both of us have seen the production before, this time it all just fell into place like a puzzle. And then at the end my friend turned to me and said that she saw a falling star just above us as soon as the second half started. She said she’d never seen anything more magical here – and she’s been coming to the Globe for years!
Nina, from our Research Team, and friend

image

My first season and many memories. The Globe visitors never cease to amaze and delight, but I must admit the interaction with our youngest visitors for Telling Tales was a highlight.
Krystyna, one of our volunteer stewards 

image

My favourite memories of the season are of James Garnon’s improv skills. When England were playing in the World Cup, during Hamlet, a groundling was watching something on his phone so James Garnon [as Claudius] took it and proceeded to watch it himself. When Polonius asked “England game?” he shushed him and then announced to the audience “2:1!”
Sarah, one of our volunteer stewards

image

I adored the jig for Emilia and the huge audience reaction for that production. And the Refugee Week events and Sonnet Sunday were big highlights! Loved seeing all the work spread across the spaces and having local community groups involved was just brilliant.
Jo, General Manager

image

Seeing our volunteer stewards kitted our in their gorgeous new, handmade aprons, designed with their input and hand sewn by Ellie Piercy – Globe actress and talented designer. On inside of each apron pocket is a piece of costume from the Globe’s costume archive so each steward wears a piece of Globe history!
Rosie, Volunteer Manager 

image

The resounding ‘YES!!’ which roared around me (and surprisingly came out of my own throat!) whilst I was a Groundling watching Emilia.
A member of the Visitor Experience team

image

Though there are no shows on the Globe stage from October – April you can take a tour of the building all year round.

Photography, from top: 
Globe theatre and Stewards photographed by Clive Sherlock 
Othello photographed by Simon Annand 
The Winter’s Tale photographed by Marc Brenner 
Hamlet photographed by Tristram Kenton 
Nanjing photographed by Pete Le May 
Emilia photographed by Helen Murray 

The true beginning of our end: Summer 2018 memories.The end of…

The true beginning of our end: Summer 2018 memories.

The end of summer is always bittersweet, but we are lucky that when the summer season closes on 14 October our shows will take place in the cosy, candlelit Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

But, it’s not over yet!

Before we close the doors of the ‘Wooden O’ we want to share some of our highlights with you. We’d love to hear from you too. You can tweet us, post on our Facebook page or comment on Instagram.

image

We were watching the Midnight Matinee of Othello and it was like we were transported to a different time and place altogether. Even though both of us have seen the production before, this time it all just fell into place like a puzzle. And then at the end my friend turned to me and said that she saw a falling star just above us as soon as the second half started. She said she’d never seen anything more magical here – and she’s been coming to the Globe for years!
Nina, from our Research Team, and friend

image

My first season and many memories. The Globe visitors never cease to amaze and delight, but I must admit the interaction with our youngest visitors for Telling Tales was a highlight.
Krystyna, one of our volunteer stewards 

image

My favourite memories of the season are of James Garnon’s improv skills. When England were playing in the World Cup, during Hamlet, a groundling was watching something on his phone so James Garnon [as Claudius] took it and proceeded to watch it himself. When Polonius asked “England game?” he shushed him and then announced to the audience “2:1!”
Sarah, one of our volunteer stewards

image

I adored the jig for Emilia and the huge audience reaction for that production. And the Refugee Week events and Sonnet Sunday were big highlights! Loved seeing all the work spread across the spaces and having local community groups involved was just brilliant.
Jo, General Manager

image

Seeing our volunteer stewards kitted our in their gorgeous new, handmade aprons, designed with their input and hand sewn by Ellie Piercy – Globe actress and talented designer. On inside of each apron pocket is a piece of costume from the Globe’s costume archive so each steward wears a piece of Globe history!
Rosie, Volunteer Manager 

image

The resounding ‘YES!!’ which roared around me (and surprisingly came out of my own throat!) whilst I was a Groundling watching Emilia.
A member of the Visitor Experience team

image

Though there are no shows on the Globe stage from October – April you can take a tour of the building all year round.

Photography, from top: 
Globe theatre and Stewards photographed by Clive Sherlock 
Othello photographed by Simon Annand 
The Winter’s Tale photographed by Marc Brenner 
Hamlet photographed by Tristram Kenton 
Nanjing photographed by Pete Le May 
Emilia photographed by Helen Murray