Category: Theatre

The Magic of Shakespeare’s GlobeIn this new series of blogs,…

The Magic of Shakespeare’s Globe

In this new series of blogs, we’re going to take you behind the scenes of our Guides Tours & Exhibition. Open all year round, the tour gives you an opportunity to learn more about this unique building and its most famous playwright, Shakespeare.

In our first blog post, Tour Guide Ffion Jones discusses why she believes that Shakespeare’s Globe is the perfect space to share theatre experiences with others.

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Whilst studying for my Masters in Creative Writing, I was introduced to Peter Brook, and I was so inspired by the ethos behind his work. Reading Peter Brook and the Mahabharata: Critical Perspectives helped me to get a grasp on what it is that I love about theatre; why I love acting, why I love writing, why I love helping people to make theatre, and why I love working at Shakespeare’s Globe.

I have worked for many years, delivering hundreds upon hundreds of tours, describing this iconic, weighty building and the magic within its walls. I am constantly amazed by my stamina and ability to keep telling the Globe’s story (and intrinsically, my own story) over and over again. Somehow, the energy of the moment, the faces in front of me and their wonderful invitation to share gets me going every time. 

I have a belief about the magic of theatre and the magic of Shakespeare’s Globe and I have experienced this magic in multiple ways, on and off stage – and there is a little dusting of it on the tours.

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The reason theatre is different to many other art forms is because it is live, because you are occupying the same space, because there are real tangible humans in front of you and because when it’s right – that’s it and then it’s gone. This is the most amazing feeling and, to me, the most rewarding art. 

I prance around, flinging my limbs and my voice about, attempting to do a one woman version of something like this, trying to suggest a tiny iota of this magic, on the tours. Peter Brook describes a communication of the “direct physical conviction of the actors, their presence and individuality” and, to me, Shakespeare’s Globe is the home of this communication. 

The shared space opens up an immediacy and shared language like nothing I’ve ever witnessed before. When Titus Andronicus parades into the theatre on ‘horseback’ showcasing his spoils of war, when Marc Anthony looks into people’s eyes and pleads to be heard, when Lancelot Gobbo enlists the help of an audience member to make a decision and when the shrewish Kate drags herself through the crowd after being starved to a point of insanity. These things make you think, make you laugh, make you be.

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With a new season of plays approaching, I wait with bated breath to stand in the yard and meet the next companies of actors, the next array of characters and the next assortment of stories. I can’t wait to tell people what personality these shows bepaint. And I can’t wait to tell them that they must come and see it for themselves, for their role as the audience is the special ingredient to making the witches brew. 

I tell people that putting Shakespeare’s plays in the original environment (or as close to it as possible) allows us to not only relive history but palpably feel the effects of Shakespeare’s plays that were intended. Peter Brook investigated the basic-ness of being human and presented theatre in its most crude form. And, I believe, that it is this element that the Globe drags out of Shakespeare’s plays, which is perhaps unexpected to an audience with anticipations of difficult language and highbrow chortling. The Globe has the beauty of the here and now. I cannot wait to be there, here and now, when this summer rolls around. 

Read more about Guided Tours & Exhibition

Words: Ffion Jones

Sources: Williams, D. (1991) Peter Brook and the Mahabharata: Critical Perspectives, London: Routledge

Photos: John Wildgoose and Shakespeare’s Globe

All’s Well That Ends Well: Rehearsal PhotosCaroline Byrne…

All’s Well That Ends Well: Rehearsal Photos

Caroline Byrne (Director of The Taming of the Shrew, 2016) brings this dark, twisted and dangerous interpretation of All’s Well That Ends Well to the candlelit intimacy of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse from 11 January – 3 March 2018

Pictured: the cast, in rehearsal, photography by Marc Brenner.

Find out more and buy tickets

See more rehearsal photos on Facebook

Playing Shakespeare 2018: Cast Announced We’re delighted to…


Philip Correia and Emilio Doorgasingh


Tyler Fayose


Charlyne Francis


Aruhan Galieva


Fiona Hampton


Ben Mansfield


Jordan Mifsud


Charlotte Mills


Rachel Winters

Playing Shakespeare 2018: Cast Announced 

We’re delighted to announce the cast for Playing Shakespeare 2018 with Deutsche Bank, Much Ado About Nothing.

Philip Correia (Claudio), Emilio Doorgasingh (Leonato), Tyler Fayose (Don Pedro), Charlyne Francis (Donna Joan), Aruhan Galieva (Hero), Fiona Hampton (Beatrice), Ben Mansfield (Benedick), Jordan Mifsud (Borachio), Charlotte Mills (Dogberry/ Pastor Francis), Rachel Winters (Margaret/Verges).

Tickets are on sale for family performances.

Playing Shakespeare 2018: Cast Announced We’re delighted to…


Philip Correia and Emilio Doorgasingh


Tyler Fayose


Charlyne Francis


Aruhan Galieva


Fiona Hampton


Ben Mansfield


Jordan Mifsud


Charlotte Mills


Rachel Winters

Playing Shakespeare 2018: Cast Announced 

We’re delighted to announce the cast for Playing Shakespeare 2018 with Deutsche Bank, Much Ado About Nothing.

Philip Correia (Claudio), Emilio Doorgasingh (Leonato), Tyler Fayose (Don Pedro), Charlyne Francis (Donna Joan), Aruhan Galieva (Hero), Fiona Hampton (Beatrice), Ben Mansfield (Benedick), Jordan Mifsud (Borachio), Charlotte Mills (Dogberry/ Pastor Francis), Rachel Winters (Margaret/Verges).

Tickets are on sale for family performances.

The Little Matchgirl On Tour: In PhotosHere are a few photos…


The cast of The Little Matchgirl.


Karl Queensborough and Guy Hughes in The Little Matchgirl.


The Little Matchgirl.


Elizabeth Westcott in The Little Matchgirl.


Edie Edmundson in The Little Matchgirl.


Katy Owen in The Little Matchgirl.


Guy Hughes, Kezrena James and Edie Edmundson in The Little Matchgirl.


Edie Edmundson and Niall Ashdown.


The cast of The Little Matchgirl.


Guy Hughes, Karl Queensborough, Kezrena James and Katy Owen in The Little Matchgirl.

The Little Matchgirl On Tour: In Photos

Here are a few photos from The Little Matchgirl, which opened this month at Bristol Old Vic,  and plays there until 14 January 2018. 

Then we are on to: Theatr Clwyd, Chichester Festival Theatre, Oxford PlayhouseTheatre Royal Plymouth, Buxton Opera House, Liverpool Everyman & Playhouse, Malvern Theatres, and home to Shakespeare’s Globe, London (27 March – 21 April).

We hope you can join us on our journey!

See more photos on Facebook >>

Photography by Steve Tanner

The Little Matchgirl On Tour: In PhotosHere are a few photos…


The cast of The Little Matchgirl.


Karl Queensborough and Guy Hughes in The Little Matchgirl.


The Little Matchgirl.


Elizabeth Westcott in The Little Matchgirl.


Edie Edmundson in The Little Matchgirl.


Katy Owen in The Little Matchgirl.


Guy Hughes, Kezrena James and Edie Edmundson in The Little Matchgirl.


Edie Edmundson and Niall Ashdown.


The cast of The Little Matchgirl.


Guy Hughes, Karl Queensborough, Kezrena James and Katy Owen in The Little Matchgirl.

The Little Matchgirl On Tour: In Photos

Here are a few photos from The Little Matchgirl, which opened this month at Bristol Old Vic,  and plays there until 14 January 2018. 

Then we are on to: Theatr Clwyd, Chichester Festival Theatre, Oxford PlayhouseTheatre Royal Plymouth, Buxton Opera House, Liverpool Everyman & Playhouse, Malvern Theatres, and home to Shakespeare’s Globe, London (27 March – 21 April).

We hope you can join us on our journey!

See more photos on Facebook >>

Photography by Steve Tanner

Read Not Dead 3 December: Cast AnnouncedJoining us for our next…


Andy Secombe and Beth Eyre


Charlie Ryall and Clark Alexander


James Wallace


Jeremy Booth


Joe Eyre


Karen Whyte


Lydia Bakelmun


Oliver Lavery


Peter Wicks and Robbie Capaldi


Sam Jenkins-Shaw and Timothy Blore

Read Not Dead 3 December: Cast Announced

Joining us for our next Read Not Dead event on 3 December (Massinger’s The Bashful Lover) are:

Andy Secombe, Beth Eyre, Charlie Ryall, Clark Alexander, James Wallace, Jeremy Booth, Joe Eyre, Karen Whyte, Lydia Bakelmun, Oliver Lavery, Peter Wicks, Robbie Capaldi, Sam Jenkins-Shaw and Timothy Blore.

Buy tickets >>

Read Not Dead 3 December: Cast AnnouncedJoining us for our next…


Andy Secombe and Beth Eyre


Charlie Ryall and Clark Alexander


James Wallace


Jeremy Booth


Joe Eyre


Karen Whyte


Lydia Bakelmun


Oliver Lavery


Peter Wicks and Robbie Capaldi


Sam Jenkins-Shaw and Timothy Blore

Read Not Dead 3 December: Cast Announced

Joining us for our next Read Not Dead event on 3 December (Massinger’s The Bashful Lover) are:

Andy Secombe, Beth Eyre, Charlie Ryall, Clark Alexander, James Wallace, Jeremy Booth, Joe Eyre, Karen Whyte, Lydia Bakelmun, Oliver Lavery, Peter Wicks, Robbie Capaldi, Sam Jenkins-Shaw and Timothy Blore.

Buy tickets >>

November: New Year, New Youth TheatreIt’s been a few months…

November: New Year, New Youth Theatre

It’s been a few months since we last blogged about our Southwark Youth Theatre, and in that time, much has changed! Company Manager Dorothy tells all…

New company, new practitioners, new company manager (hello – that’s me!).

After two rounds of auditions back in October, we began meeting each Saturday morning in the Globe’s Sackler Studios where, under the tutelage of our Globe Education Practitioners, the company spend two hours learning and practising skills in text work, movement, improvisation and voice.

The fundamental principles of the Southwark Youth Theatre are as follows: five core values, four Globe Education Practitioners, three sharing performances, two fabulous stages, one excellent company. We aim to bring our core values (Respect, Connect, Support, Perform, Commit) into everything we do. Our four Practitioners (Kate, Sarah, Jack and Scott) are professional actors with years of experience working at the Globe who lead our weekly youth theatre sessions. 

Our sharing performances are held at the end of our three terms on our two fabulous stages (the Globe and Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) and performed by our brilliant company of 10-18 year olds who live or learn in the borough of Southwark. This year, all of our sharing performances will be based around a great Shakespearean tragedy: King Lear. With eye-gouging and treachery aplenty, this is a story guaranteed to entertain audiences and performers alike, but before tackling it head on, the company have to build up the skills they will need for their final performances.

Our last two sessions have been particularly exciting; focussing on the practical skills of stage combat and puppetry. Under the guidance of Jack and Sarah, the company built their own newspaper puppets, and learnt how to heighten their focus to make the puppets breathe, move and think. The following week, they put their gladiatorial heads on and choreographed a short fight scene under the watchful eye of fight director Marcello. 

Once everyone had got their breath back, we then hopped on a train and headed off for our first external trip of the year: Devil You Know Theatre Company’s production of Macbeth at the Bussey Building, in Peckham Rye. During the Q&A session after the performance, the Youth Theatre Company took the opportunity to pick the actors’ brains on everything from how to learn lines, to how to approach playing a character who is morally repulsive.

Next Saturday we shall meet again (in thunder, lightning and in rain) to begin preparing for our December sharing in earnest. So, as we prepare to leave Birnam Wood and venture once again towards the cliffs of Dover, all that remains for me to say is thank you very much for reading, and would you please join me in welcoming the Southwark Youth Theatre Company of 2017-18!

Find out more >>

November: New Year, New Youth TheatreIt’s been a few months…

November: New Year, New Youth Theatre

It’s been a few months since we last blogged about our Southwark Youth Theatre, and in that time, much has changed! Company Manager Dorothy tells all…

New company, new practitioners, new company manager (hello – that’s me!).

After two rounds of auditions back in October, we began meeting each Saturday morning in the Globe’s Sackler Studios where, under the tutelage of our Globe Education Practitioners, the company spend two hours learning and practising skills in text work, movement, improvisation and voice.

The fundamental principles of the Southwark Youth Theatre are as follows: five core values, four Globe Education Practitioners, three sharing performances, two fabulous stages, one excellent company. We aim to bring our core values (Respect, Connect, Support, Perform, Commit) into everything we do. Our four Practitioners (Kate, Sarah, Jack and Scott) are professional actors with years of experience working at the Globe who lead our weekly youth theatre sessions. 

Our sharing performances are held at the end of our three terms on our two fabulous stages (the Globe and Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) and performed by our brilliant company of 10-18 year olds who live or learn in the borough of Southwark. This year, all of our sharing performances will be based around a great Shakespearean tragedy: King Lear. With eye-gouging and treachery aplenty, this is a story guaranteed to entertain audiences and performers alike, but before tackling it head on, the company have to build up the skills they will need for their final performances.

Our last two sessions have been particularly exciting; focussing on the practical skills of stage combat and puppetry. Under the guidance of Jack and Sarah, the company built their own newspaper puppets, and learnt how to heighten their focus to make the puppets breathe, move and think. The following week, they put their gladiatorial heads on and choreographed a short fight scene under the watchful eye of fight director Marcello. 

Once everyone had got their breath back, we then hopped on a train and headed off for our first external trip of the year: Devil You Know Theatre Company’s production of Macbeth at the Bussey Building, in Peckham Rye. During the Q&A session after the performance, the Youth Theatre Company took the opportunity to pick the actors’ brains on everything from how to learn lines, to how to approach playing a character who is morally repulsive.

Next Saturday we shall meet again (in thunder, lightning and in rain) to begin preparing for our December sharing in earnest. So, as we prepare to leave Birnam Wood and venture once again towards the cliffs of Dover, all that remains for me to say is thank you very much for reading, and would you please join me in welcoming the Southwark Youth Theatre Company of 2017-18!

Find out more >>